http%3A%2F%2Fdemandware.edgesuite.net%2Faaiv_prd%2Fon%2Fdemandware.static%2FSites-Aritzia_CA-Site%2FSites-Aritzia_CA-Library%2Fdefault%2Fv1398238201819%2Fthe_magazine%2Fissue_1%2Falice-cavanagh-paris%2Fpostcards_alicecavanagh_articlehero1365x601.jpg Number%20Theory%20:%20Sisters%20Hannah%20and%20Colette%20Thurlow's%20ethereal%20self-titled%20debut%20album%20for%20their%20group%202%3A54%20was%20one%20of%20the%20most%20highly%20acclaimed%20of%20last%20year.%20Now%2C%20the%20shoegazey%20alt-rock%20duo%20is%20working%20hard%20on%20their%20follow%20up%E2%80%94that%20is%2C%20when%20they're%20not%20performing%20inside%20of%20London%20chapels.%20Here%2C%20the%20Irish-born%20Bristol%20natives%20give%20us%20a%20heavenly%20exclusive%20performance%20of%20their%20single%20%26ldquo%3BYou're%20Early.%26rdquo%3B%3Cbr%2F%3EBy%20Caitlin%20Smith http://aritzia.com/en/issues/issue-1/245/ea1-254.html http://goo.gl/zADAp9 Check%20out%20the%20latest%20in%20the%20@Aritzia%20Magazine.%20Number%20Theory%20-

Number Theory

Sisters Hannah and Colette Thurlow's ethereal self-titled debut album for their group 2:54 was one of the most highly acclaimed of last year. Now, the shoegazey alt-rock duo is working hard on their follow up—that is, when they're not performing inside of London chapels. Here, the Irish-born Bristol natives give us a heavenly exclusive performance of their single “You're Early.”
By Caitlin Smith

ARE YOUR PARENTS MUSICIANS? DID THEY SUPPORT YOUR CREATIVITY GROWING UP?
Hannah: Our parents have always been very supportive. They don't play any instruments but we grew up surrounded by music. There was always music playing in the house.
Colette: We were raised on music like The Band, Rory Gallagher, Patsy Cline, Al Green, and Stevie Wonder at home. It all had an influence—it ignited that first real love for and connection to music.

WHEN DID YOU START WRITING MUSIC TOGETHER?
H: We started playing together in our early twenties. Just experimenting and hanging out with our guitars for fun.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES TO COLLABORATING WITH A SIBLING?
C: I think it's a huge support working with each other. So much is unsaid—we just know when things are right. I think that kind of sisterly intuition is key to the music.

I'VE READ THAT QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE WAS QUITE AN INFLUENCE ON YOUR SOUND AS TEENAGERS. WHY IS THIS?
H: Josh Homme is constantly creating such innovative guitar lines and sounds. He has such a presence on record and live.
C: Musically, they always sound like they're in the future. And they feel like a gang—the real deal.

2:54 IS THE TIME ON THE SONG “A HISTORY OF BAD MEN” BY THE MELVINS WHEN A PARTICULAR DRUM ROLL KICKS IN. WHAT IS THE FASCINATION WITH THAT DRUM ROLL?
C: There's a dizzying choral build up—“Dire, dire, dire, it's fleeting,” which is a lyric I love—and then 2 minutes and 54 seconds hits, and suddenly, there's a swooping, doomy bass line to fall into. I love it when a song gives you that feeling.